INSOR Russia: Institute of Contemporary Development
Updated April 18, 2019

February 6, 2012

Россия в иностранной прессе

PROTESTS CHIP AWAY AT PUTIN’S AUTHORITY

The Financial Times

Many questions remain over how far Mr Putin may be willing to engage in reform and in doing so loosen his grip on power. “The enlightened people in Putin’s team are going to try and make sure reforms take place, that a rightwing party is forged and that parliament is more balanced,” said Igor Yurgens, the head of a liberal think-tank that had earlier advised Mr Medvedev. “But if this doesn’t happen, there is going to be a real crisis.”

WŁADZE ZAWYŻAJĄ DANE O LICZBIE UCZESTNIKÓW WIECU NA POKŁONNEJ GÓRZE

Portal ARCANA (Польша)

Według rosyjskich politologów Ministerstwo Spraw Wewnętrznych Federacji Rosyjskiej dokonało nadużyć publikując dane o wielkości proputinowskiej manifestacji. Politolodzy nie mają zaufania do danych zaprezentowanych przez Zarząd Główny MSW w Moskwie, które podało, że na wiecu poparcia dla Władimira Putina zgromadziło się około stu czterdziestu tysięcy ludzi. „Wątpię by dane te były wiarygodne” — powiedział dyrektor Instytutu Nowoczesnego Rozwoju (INSOR) Igor Jurgens. Politolog nie wierzy również w dane MSW dotyczące liczby uczestników marszu opozycji 4 lutego. „Na Placu Bołotnym nawet wizualnie było więcej niż trzydzieści sześć tysięcy ludzi” — komentuje działania ministerstwa Jurgens.

ANALYSTS SAY POLICE STATISTICS OF MOSCOW RALLY TURNOUTS FALSE

Kyiv Post

«Even visually, there were more than 36,000 people on Bolotnaya Square, and I doubt there were 140,000 in Poklonnaya Gora,» Igor Yurgens, chief executive of the Institute of Contemporary Development (INSOR), told Interfax. (...)

Yurgens, in comments on the effect of previous demonstrations and rallies, argued that events of this kind might trigger public unrest in the run-up to the March 4 presidential election.

«If there is mounting confrontation, any cooperation between government and opposition brokered by [former finance minister Alexei] Kudrin, [Russian Human Rights Commissioner Vladimir] Lukin and other figures will be out of the question. And then we'll have an exacerbated political situation in the run-up to the presidential election. In that case it'll be hard to have a one-round election, a runoff will be needed in order to legitimatize Putin's victory,» Yurgens said.

He suggested that the office of vice president be re-instituted after the election. «I believe that it would be essential to restore the office of vice president in Russia. The vice president would oversee reforms of the upper and lower houses of parliament and a vertical reform of the judiciary, as is done all over the world,» he said.

«It would be quite in order if, in case Putin wins, [incumbent President] Dmitry Medvedev took the office of vice president.»

SF-KORRESPONDENT: «PUTIN KÖNNTEN MEHRERE ZACKEN AUS DER KRONE FALLEN»

SRF (Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen, Цюрих)

Jewgeni Gontmakher vom russischen Institut für zeitgenössische Entwicklung (Russian Institute of Contemporary Development INSOR) erklärte den Wandel in der russischen Gesellschaft im Dezember so: «Politik ist in Russland plötzlich öffentlich geworden. Es ist nicht mehr nebensächlich, sich mit Politik zu beschäftigen. Das ist in Russland noch nie passiert.»

Gontmakher sprach davon, dass die Proteste, die nach der Dumawahl Anfang Dezember ihren Anfang genommen hatten, einen Neuanfang in den Beziehungen zwischen dem Kreml und der Bevölkerung eingeläutet hätten.

Noch vor einem Jahr sah seine Bilanz anders aus. Die Russen wüssten zwar, dass die Korruption im Land zunehme und aus dem «System Putin» komme. Das Problem aber sei, dass es keine politischen Alternativen gebe.

BRUSHING UP THE FUTURE — IGOR YURGENS PAINTS MEDVEDEV OUT OF THE PRIME MINISTRY

Business Insider

After he left Soviet trade union and youth organization work behind, Igor Yurgens was one of the most talented advocates of the commercial Russian insurance industry. So he knows how to calculate risk and how to write an insurance premium to cover it. The Centre for Contemporary Development (INSOR), which Yurgens directs, has been widely viewed as the brain’s trust for Dmitry Medvedev’s run at a second term. But when Yurgens suggests the names of others more likely to become prime minister, after Vladimir Putin wins the presidential election in March, his assessment warrants careful attention. Like all insurance policies, it’s a good idea to read the small print.

Here are the excerpts from Yurgens’s interview appearing in Novaya Gazeta’s edition of February 3:

“He [Putin] may make Alexei Kudrin his prime minister and Kudrin will start cutting the excessive costs. Privatization may be launched. Russian monopolies might be reformed, the ones called “natural” for no particular reason. Even such Putin’s colleagues as Timchenko can play their role here. Timchenko has distribution networks. Allied with Novatec and Sibur, he may well challenge Gazprom as a monopoly. It will be a model of non-violent decentralization.

“[Former Russian ambassador to NAO, now deputy defence minister Dmitry] Rogozin did well handling the matter of Kaliningrad transit with the West and representing Russia in NATO. As a politician, however, he refuses to play second fiddle to [Deputy Prime Minister Igor] Shuvalov. In his life he will fight to the end. Which, for him, is presidency.

“I’ve known this man [Medvedev] since 2000. He has a positive potential. He is grappling with a dilemma now. He has to choose between leaving his imprint on history on the one hand and keeping his comfortable position, yet not the top one, on the other.

“He is already a member of the club that comprises people like Clinton and Blair, the people who can do fine just by giving lectures. After all, it was Medvedev who arranged the reset. He is the man who did what he did in Poland. And he is only 46. And to finish his career like this. I still think that had he remained the president, we’d have avoided a lot of trouble.